Tips and Tricks to Assess Programming Skills Like a Professional 

Most recruiters are challenged when it comes to finding the best talents for highly technical jobs like computer programming. That's mainly because they don't know how to evaluate programming skills like a professional. If you are one of them and you need help assessing your IT candidates, then be sure to keep these tips in mind:

  • Define the job requirements
    Before you start assessing programming skills like a professional, you need to identify the specific skills to be evaluated. The requirements will be different for every IT role, so make sure to discuss the matter with the manager or the supervisor. Who is your ideal candidate? How much experience should he or she have to be considered for the position? Besides the technical skills, it's also good to pinpoint soft skills and attributes that your company is looking for in a talent.
  • Use online candidate assessment tools
    Online candidate assessment tools offer a convenient way to administer exams. They also eliminate human errors and thus guarantee the accuracy of results. Just make sure that the assessment tools you choose will be able to test the specific programming skills that you require or evaluate the candidates' language knowledge and expertise.
  • Consider using online programming challenges
    These platforms can also be designed for your business's sole use to test programming skills like a professional. The online programming challenges provide different coding tests for different programming languages. You can adjust certain features (such as the difficulty level and the language) better to check your candidates' technical know-how and problem-solving capabilities.

Did you know recruiters use programming or coding challenge websites as sources of top-caliber candidates? They follow the leader-boards to see the programmers who have high ratings and scores in their challenges. Some recruiters or companies will even run their competitions with prizes to entice more professionals.

Posted by Pallavi Joshi Friday, July 17, 2020 2:39:00 AM Categories: tips and tricks

7 Ways To Get People To Respond To Your Recruiting Emails 

Technical talent acquisition is more candidate-driven than ever before. As the unemployment rate hovers in the low single digits, and job seekers become more conscious about company image, hiring professionals are faced with a shortage of talent in the job market. Although the development of advanced recruitment systems has lessened the pain of sourcing, competition for top talent remains high.

One option, personalized emails, cuts through the noise. They give you the opportunity to show genuine interest in the candidate and let them know you’ve done your research on their experience and passions.

If you can connect with your candidate and make them feel they have the potential, you increase the chances of receiving an actual response.

Here are seven actionable tips to get people to respond to your recruiting emails:

Personalization matters  

From a psychological viewpoint, communicating with qualified candidates is best approached by adding an element of human emotion in your outreach efforts.

Today, email continues to be one of the best platforms for personalized messages. It works better than social media in the world of recruitment. But keep in mind that emails that sound too automated rarely persuade job seekers to finish reading the entire invite, let alone apply for the job.

Make sure to address them by their name and try to be specific. You could start by saying, “Hey [Candidate’s First Name], I came across your LinkedIn profile, and it’s not every day that I find someone who can do both graphic design and web development.”

How’s your subject line?

The subject line is a fundamental part of your email as it is the first thing the recipient notices. The challenge here is stringing together the right words to compel the reader to read past that notification on their screen.

Convey the summary of your message in the most creative way possible while maintaining a voice that perfectly represents your company’s brand. It should be full of promise, but be careful not to make it sound too much like a sales pitch. For example, you could use “Your Dream Job Is Closer Than You Think,”or something more personalized, like the example above.

To prevent your message from landing in the spam folder, avoid promotional and misleading terms. It also helps to use an email address containing a real name rather than a nonhuman one.

Candidate praise

The point of sending personalized recruiting emails is to let candidates feel you are convinced that they have the qualities you’re looking for. Mention experiences and skills that caught your attention and state how you believe these are suited to the job opening. Compliment them on their credentials to not only encourage a positive response but also influence their outlook on your company in a good way.

In the middle of your email, you could say, “Our Marketing Specialist sent me a copy of your portfolio and I was really impressed by your designs, particularly the project you did for [insert name of organization].”

Straight to the Point

Although a well-written introduction—for example, citing trends in the industry—can paint your company as professional and entertaining, quality candidates will also want to get straight to the point. Top talent, if not nearly every working professional, receives dozens of emails per day so it’s important to send a clear message early on in the body of your email.

The most sought-after candidates actively searching for a job are probably skimming through multiple job invitations at a time. You would want to consider the candidate’s time by highlighting the position available and the specific skills you’re looking for. Reveal only the most important information about the job and be as concise as you can.

Here’s an example of a first line that goes straight to the point:

“I’m looking for someone proficient at SEO to fill a senior Marketing role, and I believe you’d make a great fit.”

Your company’s edge

Find a way to make your company stand out by emphasizing your edge among the rest in the industry. What can you offer that can pique every job seeker’s curiosity? A strong employer branding is one of the many recruitment trends you can implement to attract top talent.

Every company specializes in one thing. Be sure to incorporate this into your email and delve even further into the position you’re offering. The very act of persuading a candidate is, in a way, establishing a relationship with them, and the best way to do this is to make them feel special. Make the job opening and invitation sound exclusive to get them to contemplate on an offer that may not come as frequently in the market.

Here’s an example of a statement that highlights a company’s competitive edge using a tone of exclusivity:

“[Company Name] has worked with over 1,000 brands, including Fortune 500 companies, in developing their dream website. We usually prioritize referred candidates, and since our Production Manager was very proud to recommend you, I’d like to know how you feel about working with us.”

Follow up

Candidates often respond to a follow-up email after ignoring the first. In this regard, persistence is key as long as enough time has passed (i.e., five to ten days). A follow-up email should sound polite and not too demanding. Most recruiters agree to a maximum of three follow-ups. In the first follow-up, you may provide a link to the job ad. The second one can serve as a reminder in case they simply missed your emails, and the third could contain well wishes for their future endeavors. With each follow-up sent, you increase your chances of getting a response.

Here are a few examples of follow-up messages:

“Hey [Candidate’s First Name], I’d like to make a gentle follow-up on this. Would you be interested in the job opening?”

“Hello [Candidate’s First Name], Please see the link below of our official job ad for you to get a better understanding of the role.”

SMS is your inroad

Candidate response times when an SMS is sent to the prospect advising them that an email has just been sent are 5 times faster.

So if speeding up the process to get a quicker response or to get tasks completed faster is high on your agenda, we recommend using SMS to compliment your email strategy.

Summary

Any recruitment challenge can be answered by understanding a candidate’s perspective. There’s a reason why candidates don’t usually answer emails that seem cold and impersonal. The best way to get a prospect to connect with you is to ensure your messages are tailored for each of them. In this way, you can persuade candidates, both active and passive, to give your company a chance.

Below is a short sample email for reaching out to a qualified candidate:

Subject Line: The Web Design Job of Your Dreams

Email Body:

Hello Adam,

Good day!

I’m Lauren, Talent Acquisition Officer at [company name]. Our Marketing Specialist sent me a copy of your portfolio and I was really impressed by your designs, particularly the project you did for [insert name of organization]. I also came across your LinkedIn profile and found that you are highly adept at Adobe Dreamweaver and Bootstrap among other relevant web designing tools.  

At [company name], we’ve been providing web development solutions for small to medium businesses for over seven years now, and we always have room for exceptional talent in our team. We currently have an opening for a senior web designer role, and I feel that your experience and skills can add significant value to what we do.

If you’re interested, please let me know so I can give you more details about the position.

Best regards,

Lauren

 

Posted by Jacquie Pirnie Tuesday, December 17, 2019 6:50:00 PM Categories: tips and tricks

Online Programming Challenges: How to Assess and What to Do? 

Many employers are seeking skilled programmers who can help their business succeed and for their brand to be widely recognized. That said, competition in the job market can be tough for programmers. If you want to get hired, you need to be able to prove to a prospective employer that you are the best candidate for a position in their company. There are many ways to do this, such as becoming certified for a particular programming method or software, or by proving your abilities and skills through online programming challenges.

Discerning employers are already looking into programming challenges online to identify the best candidates to hire. There, you can do a programming skills test, which can improve your programming prowess. If you are new to programming, you are still welcome to take the online skills test to assess how much you know and which areas you should improve on. One of the leading coding challenges online is a fun and educational test that will teach you the concepts of modern programming languages in a simple environment that can make you feel like you are merely playing a game.

With online programming challenges, you can start from the basics and continue to advance to more challenging skills tests, while learning as you continue to play. Rest assured, the programming skills test will teach the techniques that can be applied to other programming languages. Some of the things you can learn are program structure, object and methods, parameterization, decomposition, loops, conditionals, debugging, optimization, and recursion. All these are delivered through a simplified platform, which you can learn to use in a few minutes.

Do not forget to challenge yourself with coding challenges online, even if you think that you are already an expert or at an advanced level. Whether you are a top software specialist or a novice in software programming, you will find the programming challenges to be helpful in assessing your strengths and weaknesses in what you do, so you can continue succeeding in your career.

Friday, November 1, 2019 7:04:00 AM Categories: computer programming tips and tricks

The Story about a Box: Programming the Perfect Square? 

On June 1, 2016, Wild Noodle introduced its summer competition. This competition consisted of 25 levels, with increasing complexity, using Herbert and the “H” language.   Herbert’s “H” language has three statements: l (left) r (right) and s (straight) and they are arranged using procedures and parameters to achieve the desired goal of solving the puzzle in the most efficient manner; otherwise known as optimization .
Though the goal of the competition seemed pretty straightforward, I was left thinking about the objectives of the game. I pondered about various options for developing a square. For example, to create a simple box, I could program Herbert, using the following order of statements:

SQUARE 1
ssrssrssrss

This program would take approximately 11 Bytes to complete and if I wanted a bigger square that this would add to the number of Bytes required.  Thus, if my desired goal was to make a square as efficient as possible, well this was not the answer, but in contrast, it was a fairly easy to program.  But if my goal was to create square with the least amount of Bytes then I would possibly use the following program to achieve my goal:

SQUARE 2
a:ssra
a

In the program above, I am using a technique called recursion .  I am asking Herbert to do the side of the square along with a turn to call itself indefinitely.  This program took only 6 bytes.  Yet again, if I wanted to make my square 5 or 10 times larger, well this would take additional bytes, again challenging the goal of efficiency.

SQUARE 3
a(A):sa(A-1)
b(A):a(A)rb(A)
b(2)

Though this program took 15 Bytes, it would eventually be more efficient than the previous program if I wanted a box larger than 11 s (statements).  This program allows me to program the number of steps forward Herbert should go for each side of the square.
Yet Herbert has so many options to solve the puzzle of the square.  Here are just a few ways to draw a square of size 10:

SQUARE 4
a(A):sa(A-1)
a(10)ra(10)ra(10)ra(10)

SQUARE 5
a(A):sa(A-1)
b:a(10)r
bbbb

SQUARE 6
a(A):sa(A-1)
b:a(10)rb
b

SQUARE 7
a(A):sa(A-1)
b(B):a(10)rb(B-1)
b(4)

SQUARE 8
a(A):sa(A-1)
b(B,C):a(C)rb(B-1,C)
b(4,10)

As I explored the myriad square creating options, I realized the beauty of Herbert.  Though the Herbert competition primary objective was to solve the given problems in the most efficient manner, the Herbert program had the ability to teach me how to think about variability of options to solve one problem and that learning the different options, allowed me to understand the complexities of problem solving.  It also allowed me to expand my ability to think outside the box.  What if I wanted to take my box and give it fancy corners or make many boxes? The more options, I created, the wider my scope to find solutions.  Look at my designs below:

Box with Fancy Corners
a(A):sa(A-1)
d(D):sld(D-1)
b(B,C,E):a(C)rd(E)srb(B-1,C,E)
b(4,10,3)

Many Boxes with Fancy Corners
a(A):sa(A-1)
d(D):sld(D-1)
b(B,C,E):a(C)rd(E)srb(B-1,C,E)
f:b(4,5,3)rsssf
f

Ultimately, Herbert and its “H” language, not only allowed me to think about the complexities of problem solving, but it also allowed me to explore the art of computer programming, the art to develop and design…Hello World!

 

View User Profile for Soraya Cardenas Dr. Soraya Cardenas holds a doctorate in Sociology and is the President of Wild Noodle.
Posted by Soraya Cardenas Monday, June 6, 2016 5:28:00 PM Categories: computer programming tips and tricks